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Freeze

Performances, Concerts Art > Kanal - Centre Pompidou
Each of Nick Steur’s sculptures is composed of two natural stones. Entering a profound state of concentration, he balances the stones one on top of the other. Playing with gravity, he constantly renews his compositions, between movement and stability.
Each of Nick Steur’s sculptures is composed of two natural stones. Entering a profound state of concentration, he balances the stones one on top of the other. With laborious precision, he orchestrates an intimate relationship between natural forces, injecting poetry into the flow of the city through his slow gestures. His meticulous attention to these raw materials invites the public to slow down and join him in a world of stone and metal. Playing with gravity, Nick Steur constantly renews his compositions, between movement and stability.Director’s note: "Freeze: To become motionless or immobile, as from surprise or attentiveness. To become unable to act or speak, to stop motion. To stop progress. To preserve. When we stop motion, we preserve. When we stop, everything else seems to move at a faster rate around us. When I concentrate on a rock, everything else can disappear. I can be truly there, see its sharpness, feel its weight. I can feel its tipping point and admire its stillness. We can never be as silent. I can imagine this rock sees more than I ever can, for it is mostly motionless. It could experience this world. I cannot enter its door. I cannot go inside. The rock doesn't experience an inside or outside, and therefore it does not really need a door. It doesn't need to exclude me. I can turn it around, observe it from all angles and imagine the centre of gravity, imagine all the theoretical lines running through its heart – I mean, its centre. We can make a stone touch another stone. We can throw it in the ocean. The water makes room for the stone and the stone doesn't need to fight for that space. I can imagine that after thousands of years it will have eroded into thousands of sand grains. Even then, those grains have no doors and this idea saddens me. I admire the rock. I admire it for having no wish, no need for recognition or possession and no need for doors. I imagine it doesn't know anything about any limits. I wish I didn't know anything about any limits. I wish I could become motionless. I wish I could freeze." Nick Steur- Duration: 1 hour - Free entrance with exhibition ticket